Making the curriculum LGBT+ inclusive (with MFL examples)

Since starting this academic year as a Newly Qualified Teacher and taking the reigns of my own teaching content and style, ensuring my teaching is both conscious and inclusive of LGBT+ identities has been a top priority of mine, alongside promoting gender and racial equality. In this post I will lay out the importance of creating an LGBT+-inclusive curriculum and offer some insight into the small – but perhaps significant – steps I have taken towards achieving this in my own Spanish and French lessons. My two main goals in adapting my resources are Normalisation and Embodiment, which I will explain and explore in this article.

Can Reggae music be a means of challenging racism, class and gender?

With the advent of reggae in the 1960s, Jamaican music exploded on the international scene (Rhiney and Cruse, 2012; p.4). Many of the lyrics in reggae songs relate to the urban experience and speak of issues pertinent to race, class, poverty, resistance and change (Rhiney and Cruse, 2012)