I teach, therefore I am? Teacher identity, symbolic interactionism and other ramblings

Is there such a thing as ‘teacher identity’? Research suggests that there is, and that developing a ‘teacher identity’ is a social process as well as a personal one. According to Beijaard, Meijer, & Verloop (2004), teachers continuously interpret and re-interpret their professional identity, which itself consists of multiple sub-identities and is highly context-dependent.

Welfare: Teacher Wellbeing

Teacher’s are reportedly some of the most stressed people of any occupational group, with the National Foundation for Educational Research (NFER) finding 20% of teachers feel tense about their job all or most of the time. But what are the causes of teachers’ stress and the subsequent mental health issues that arise?

Rethinking Learning

In recent times, the expanding field of cognitive science has weighed in on what learning looks like and has had quite an effect on British education. According to Sweller et al (2011), learning necessitates change(s) in the long-term memory: “‘if nothing in the long-term memory has been altered, nothing has been learned”. This sort of thinking, that successfully ‘uploading’ pieces of information into one’s long-term memory constitutes learning, has become popular in recent times. I suppose it’s coherent with the dictionary definition. After all, how can we ‘acquire’ knowledge and skills if not by storing information in our brains?

What is the purpose of Education?

Questions around the purpose(s) of education are as old as education itself. Ancient Greek philosophers contemplated the purpose of education, pondered the suitability of certain materials as educational content, and arguably first developed the connection between educating citizens and achieving social justice. In the UK, ‘education’ in the sense of formal training, not carried out by one’s own family, was traditionally reserved for the elite, for whom education was often about becoming ‘cultured’.

The lesser-known benefits of learning a second language

There are so many reasons to learn a foreign language, not least for the communicative potential and employability language skills can offer. Nonetheless, foreign language learning has been on a steady decline in British education in recent years. With the world more interconnected than ever before, there has arguably never been a better time to learn a foreign language. This short article aims to summarise some of the lesser-known benefits of language learning, highlighting just how much there is to be gained from learning a foreign language.

The truth about Coronavirus

Does it come from Corona beer? U.S soldiers in China? Is it part of a Chinese plot to cripple the global economy? Or patented by Bill Gates as part of an Illuminati plot to depopulate the world? I’m here to tell you the truth about Coronavirus.

A Critical Exploration of the Concept of ‘Human’

This essay aims to engage in a interdisciplinary exploration of the concept of the ‘human’ (and necessarily also with the ‘animal’), its history and construction, to deconstruct it, and to conclude that the social sciences need to reflexively engage with this concept in order to move beyond the anthropocentric paradigm

What Has Been the Legacy of Neoliberalism in Latin America?

From its European roots, neoliberalism arrived in Latin America in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with right-wing governments in Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Chile and Peru hoping to bring about revolutionary economic change by adopting the World Bank’s so-called ‘Washington Consensus’, a neoliberal formula of market-orientated policies